themes and issues

goodluckbadluckgoodluckbadluckgoodluckbadluck

I have grouped some superstitions I’ve read about under the most obvious headings “good luck” and “bad luck”. Some of them were totally new to me. It’s really incredible how creative we humans can be when we come to a topic like this. Have a look at this one, it has been created especially for you students!

If you use the same pencil to take a test that you used for studying to take the test you will get good marks as the pencil remembers the answers!

GOOD LUCK BAD LUCK
If a black cat walks towards you if a black cat walks away from you
Wearing new clothes on Easter Sunday Breaking a mirror brings bad luck for seven years
Saying ‘white rabbit’ three times in a row on the first day of each month Leaving your shoes upside down or putting them on the table
Find a cricket in the house Opening an umbrella indoors
Bring a frog into a house Passing someone on the stairs
Seeing three butterflies together, or if the first butterfly you see is white, you will be lucky throughout the year. Number thirteen, or Friday thirteen
Putting money in the pocket of new clothes Having the feathers of a within  peacock your home
Seeing two magpies Seeing one magpie
Finding a four-leaved clover Spilling salt
Killing a bee which is trying to enter into your home
Keeping a hat on the bed
Getting  out of the bed on the other side than the one you got in
Spilling salt
Walking under a ladder

Some of these superstitions may not correspond to superstitions we have in Italy, so I need your help to make this list as complete as possible 😉

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One thought on “goodluckbadluckgoodluckbadluckgoodluckbadluck

  1. There are lots of superstitions about New Year; for example, eating lentils on 31st December brings luck. The other superstitions that i know are: hanging a horseshoe above the door brings luck, never starting or finishing something on Tuesdays and Fridays (there’s a famous proverb, too), walking under the rain (“wet bride, lucky bride”, even if i’ve found out that in England “the bride that the sun shines on is happy”), the singing of a rooster..:)

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